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Caring Really Is as Simple as Sharing

How the smallest act can change someone’s day.



It was going to be one of those days. You know, the days when from the moment you wake up you know that bipolar is going to color your world gray and make your body move in a zombie-like fashion.

I do not love those days.

Sleep was elusive the night before, and my body throbbed with each beat of my heart. My brain retired to its darkest place, and the voices inside sang a chorus of my worthlessness.

Like most of you, work is not an option. If I want to eat and have a roof over my head, I have to drag my rebellious butt out of bed.

It was going to be one of those days… until one kind act changed it all.

Bipolar Disorder Symptom Checklist

Improve their day

With bipolar disorder, unpleasant days are a frequent occurrence. Throw a physical chronic illness into the mix, and the days show up more abundantly.

As I sat at my desk staring blankly at my computer screen, all I could think of was going home, slithering back into bed, and spending the rest of the day with the blankets pulled up over my head.

Then my phone’s notification alert went off. Up on my screen popped a beautiful picture of a sunset with the simple words, “Thinking of you.”

The text message came from a friend I hadn’t talked to in weeks. She was clueless about how dreadful of a day I was experiencing. She simply thought of me and performed one simple act to improve my day.

And it worked.


“Do your little bit of good where you are; it’s those little bits of good put together that overwhelm the world.” – Desmond Tutu


Two pandas loving each other - When you have a chronic and mental illness, you can feel powerless to improve someone's day. This post examines how even the smallest acts matter and make the world a better place.
Please share on Pinterest. Graphic created with Canva.

You are capable

When you have a chronic illness, it’s easy to deceive yourself into thinking you’re incapable of doing anything to make the world a better place. The thought of helping others seems like a goal that requires more energy than what’s available to you.

Yet, often, the most valuable things are also the smallest.

I sent a message back to my friend to thank her for her message. I didn’t tell her how awful my day was going or how much her kind message improved things.

Someone had thought of me and cared enough to send me tangible proof. I wasn’t worthless and unloved after all.

Suddenly, I felt like I could conquer the day ahead. The voices inside spoke in quieter whispers, and the pain in my body became less oppressive.


Image by Alex Tran from Pixabay

Caring is as simple as sharing

As I wrote last week, we all have something beautiful to give. As mental illness wages war against us, it’s too easy to focus on the battle and its forced limitations.

However, even if you’re confined to spending the day in bed, there are things you can do to improve the lives of others.

Kind acts are more than buying presents or doing chores. Even a text message or friendly smile can change the course of a loved one’s day.

If there’s someone you’re thinking of, send them a text message and tell them. Send a picture that inspired positive emotions in you. Share a link to the panda video you’ve been watching. I know I’m not the only one.


Here’s your daily dose of cuteness.

The same friend and I talked recently about how much we enjoyed receiving cards in the mail. She said, “We all love getting a card, to know someone thought of us. And can prove it!”

Making trips to the store to buy cards is challenging in this pandemic world, so I’ve made a few to help you out. In the resource library, there are cards you can print from home to brighten a friend’s day. To get free access, visit this page.

Those tiny acts of kindness can be the little push someone needs to make it through their day. Caring really is as simple as sharing.

If you’re looking for more positive words of encouragement, be sure to follow my Instagram where I post positive quotes and affirmations every weekday.

Until next time… Keep fighting.


Hands reaching out for each other - When you have a chronic and mental illness, you can feel powerless to improve someone's day. This post examines how even the smallest acts matter and make the world a better place.
Please share on Pinterest. Graphic created with Canva.


Two pandas huddled together - When you have a chronic and mental illness, you can feel powerless to improve someone's day. This post examines how even the smallest acts matter and make the world a better place.
Please share on Pinterest. Graphic created with Canva.

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